1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Reinforcing the Exhaust Parts

I’m juggling many different things on the Roamer refit right now, but all of them are essential must-do items if I’m going to splash later this year. Getting the Cummins 6CTA Diamonds attached to the exhaust system, fuel lines, and raw water are three of those things. Some exhaust parts arrived a while back, so it’s time to reinforce the fiberglass tubes where the clamps squeeze the hose. Without reinforcement, the clamps can cause the fiberglass to crack.

400 hours on the turbo, which looks good inside

400 hours on the turbos, which both look good inside

New exhaust anti-crush sleeves and clamps

New exhaust anti-crush sleeves and clamps

First, use a grinder to rough up the exterior of the clamp sleeves

First, use a grinder to rough up the exterior of the clamp sleeves

Next, a die grinder roughs up the inside of the exhaust tubes

Next, a die grinder roughs up the inside of the exhaust tubes

High temp epoxy bonds the sleeve to the elbow

High temp epoxy bonds the sleeve to the elbow

One down, one to go

One down, one to go

Muffler will need crush sleeves, too

Muffler will need crush sleeves, too

In the pic above, the muffler is sitting on a tray I made using scrap aluminum sheet from the aft deck enclosure and 6063 aluminum angle. Because I’m using Centek waterlift mufflers, I wanted to position the muffler as low as possible so the spill-over point from the muffler to the exhaust outlet is lower than the spill-over point of the dry portion of the exhaust riser. That will make the exhaust system inherently safe by making it virtually impossible for sea water to back up into the dry part of the exhaust. I’ll be welding that muffler tray in soon.

The stick shows the direction the exhaust hose will have to take to meet the riser

The stick shows the direction the exhaust hose will have to take to meet the riser

While the epoxy cures for the crush sleeves in the exhaust elbows and outlets, I’m wrapping up fitting the muffler trays. But there’s other stuff going on, too.

Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Relocating the Fuel Tank Fills

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6 comments on “1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Reinforcing the Exhaust Parts

  1. Colin Hulse says:

    I had a look at her sister boat yesterday. 1968 aluminum roamer in Detroit. The ask is 56 grand. I owe you a card of thanks because reading your blog helped me understand what I was facing. I can’t see paying his ask. Lots of mysterious answers to my direct questions.

    • 1969roamer46 says:

      I accept gift cards of thanks, as well as bank checks, money orders, paypal, and, of course, cash. 😉
      Mysterious answers to questions on a purchase like that is a good reason to walk away. I think that boat’s been for sale for a while.
      Cheers,
      Q

  2. b hester says:

    I’ve binge-surfed your project and am thoroughly impressed with your dedication and workmanship. However, your heroic efforts have returned me to my senses after succumbing to delusional thinking about a local 41 Roamer for $6k!

  3. Peter Hitchcock says:

    Hi, Top work as always, what’s left to do before getting wet???

    • 1969roamer46 says:

      Thanks! The honey-do list isn’t too long–glass, portholes–but interior panels have to be fit before the portholes can be installed–finish the exhaust, weld in new raw water standpipes, seacocks, strainers, finish the fuel lines, tank vents and inlets…some electrical. Install the swim platform…that’s all that comes to mind now, but I’m sure I’m missing plenty of stuff.
      Stay tuned!
      Q

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