1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: V-berth Cabinetry Storage Boxes

Summer has officially arrived, but for more than a month it’s been miserable in the tent. When it’s a beautiful day outside, it’s hellishly hot and humid in that plastic bubble. Using fans helps how I feel, but epoxy has a very short pot life even when I use the slowest hardener. It’s very frustrating. That said, I’m still making progress in the V-berth.

Time to install the bed foundation

Glued and screwed gussets

Mark the cabinet cut lines and rabbets in the big bed foundation panel

I use aluminum angle to guide the router

The track saw extrusions work well as a router guide, too

I use this handy little plunge saw with only 1/16″ kerf to cut the cabinet opening

Then I finish the corners with a jigsaw

This will make a nice cabinet door

Cut the last rabbets on the back-side of the foundation panel

The panel is ready for installation

But first, I’m going to make the cabinet box and attach it to the panel. I considered doing it after I installed the panel, but I think it’ll be easier if the box is installed first.

The back of the cabinet box

Trimmed here and there to clear the hull framing

After cutting the rest of the cabinet box panels, I took them home and varnished them. I’ve got a bunch of cans of Varathane, lacquer, Minwax polyurethane and Helmsman Spar Varnish I’d like to use up. The inside of these cabinets is a good place for it.

3 coats of Minwax Helmsman Spar Varnish looks pretty good

Dry fit…looks pretty good!

Dry-fit the box…we’re ready for epoxy

Glued and clamped together

The hot temps in the tent make it challenging to glue the box together. The epoxy kicks really fast. First I wet out the rabbets and the matching panel edges with straight epoxy, then I add wood flour to the epoxy and apply it over the wetted out areas. Next, I fit the pieces together and clamp until I get some of the thickened epoxy squeezing out of the joint. Then I wipe down the joint with alcohol to remove any excess epoxy, and it’s on to the next piece until it’s all assembled.

Next day, epoxy the joints and mate the box to the panel

Support the ends of the panel and weigh down the middle

I have one more box to make, then I’ll insulate everything and install the cabinets.

Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: More V-berth Cabinetry Storage Boxes

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4 comments on “1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: V-berth Cabinetry Storage Boxes

  1. Mr. Q,

    Thanks for the inspiration every week. I have a Roamer 43 and it needs [everything]. If you hadn’t been out here running this show and publishing so well I may have thrown in the towel when I received my engine survey results. The boat is extraordinarily well designed and I think it deserves to live into the future. So off we go…using your work partially as a guide.

    K

  2. stingrayl82 says:

    Q, Are you sure you won’t be able to splash her this season? You’re kicking ass on the interior! BTW, a thought entered my mind as I was reading your blog this morning…are you turning over the engines at least once a month, so they don’t lock up?

    • 1969roamer46 says:

      Thanks! But there’s no way I’m splashing this year. There’s still a lot of stuff that has to happen before I expose the exterior to the elements.

      On the engines, I don’t turn them over monthly. They’re pickled, but I do rotate the crank once a year or so.

      Cheers,
      Q

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