1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Aft Stateroom Porthole Surround Panels V

With the port side transom porthole surround panels cut and dry-fitted, the two major vertical panels are temporarily attached to the hull frames and square to each other, and the transom vent chutes are cut and fitted, I’m ready to make the starboard side panels.

Short upright panel is a remnant

Short upright panel is a remnant

The panel above was a leftover from the aft stateroom walls. There’s always a question about whether or not to keep scraps since they take up space and can make for a messy work area. But this one turned out to be a good choice even with a dripped epoxy stain on one corner. That corner will be up against the framing…you’ll never see it.

Pocket screws will secure the panel to the overhead beam

Pocket screws will secure the panel to the overhead beam

Next, cut the 1/4" mahogany plywood surround panel

Next, cut the 1/4″ mahogany plywood surround panel

Good lookin' wood!

Good lookin’ wood!

Use the port side horizontal panel as a pattern

Use the port side horizontal panel as a pattern

Gotta love that EZ-One track saw for perfectly angled cuts

Gotta love that EZ-One track saw for perfectly angled cuts

Next, cut the rabbet for the 1/4" panel

Next, cut the rabbet for the 1/4″ panel

Looks about right

Looks about right

I love it when a plan comes together

I love it when a plan comes together

I’ve been thinking of next steps on the cabinetry back here and decided to take advantage of that triangular space below the horizontal panel. Looks like a good place for a shelf…

More plywood scraps will make a nice cabinet box

More plywood scraps will make a nice cabinet box

An epoxy drip messed up the edge of this panel, but most of it gets cut off

An epoxy drip messed up the edge of this panel, but most of it gets cut off anyway

If that epoxy drip had been an inch farther away from the edge, I wouldn’t have been able to use this panel. How’s that for good aim!?! 🙂

The track saw quickly cuts nice rabbets

The track saw quickly cuts nice rabbets in the bottom piece

More rabbets on the side panel

More rabbets on the side panel

Nice fit!

Nice fit!

Nice!

Nice!

Now THAT's a square box

Now THAT’s a square box. The rabbets are all that’s holding it together.

Booyah

Booyah

That’s a wrap for the starboard porthole surround panels. I’ll make a similar box for the port side, too. But the stack of panels needing clear coating is getting too big. I’ve been talking with my painter, and he indicated that he could come sand and spray panels on a weekend day if there’s a space at my boat to do it. We did that before when he painted the windshield frame on the aft deck. But the problem with that approach is that it takes a day to cover the whole boat, including the aft deck, in plastic. And to avoid dried overspray becoming airborne dust particles, we’d have to re-cover the whole thing after each painting session. That’s a lot of wasted time and money.

So…I talked to the yard owner and have been given permission to make a portable paint booth. The plan I’ve come up with will yield a clean room spray booth that’s big enough to spray the 16′ long mahogany safety rails, and it’ll have filtered intake and exhaust. We’ve been using the same paint fume extractor and exhaust filters as Weaver Boatworks, the local boat manufacturer where my Boatamalan painter* works. So if it’s good enough for a commercial builder it ought to suffice for somebody who only does this stuff on a few weekends. When not in use, it’ll fold up against the side of Tent Model XXX. If it works out the way I want, it shouldn’t take more than a couple of hours to set it up. That’s the plan. We’ll see how it turns out…

*Boatamalan: portmanteau indicating highly skilled boat workers of Central American origin. They’re actually from Honduras, but boat + [Guat]amalan has a nicer ring to it. ;-)

Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Making an Origami Spray Booth

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