1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Welding the Port Exhaust Riser Showerhead

The port riser showerhead was a bit easier to weld up than the starboard riser since it doesn’t have that sharp mandrel bend just before the showerhead can. Still, it took pretty much a whole day to cut all the holes, fit the water inlet and overflow pipe, purge, and get the welding done.

 

First, cut the raw water inlet tube

First, cut the raw water inlet tube

Point it just behind the exhaust flange and mark with a sharpie

Point it just behind the exhaust flange and mark with a sharpie

Cope the raw water inlet tube to match the showerhead pipe

Cope the raw water inlet tube to match the showerhead pipe

Fire up the Zeny Cut 50 and rough cut the raw water inlet hole

Fire up the Zeny Cut 50 and rough cut the raw water inlet hole

The Zeny plasma cutter is a very useful tool...and only $188!

The Zeny plasma cutter is a very useful tool…and only $188!

Next, clean up the hole with a carbide burr on

Next, clean up the hole with a carbide burr

Cutting the hole takes less than ten seconds. Cleaning up the hole takes another minute or two. I don’t need a plasma cutter all the time, but it’s great to have one around! What a time saver!

Looks good!

Looks good!

Mark the hole for the raw water overflow

Mark the hole for the raw water overflow

And fire up the Zeny again

And fire up the Zeny again

Line up the marks, start the purge, and start welding

Line up the marks, start the purge, and start welding

Fuse the inside after the outside is welded

Fuse the inside joints after the outside is welded

Ready to weld the showerhead to the exhaust

Ready to weld the showerhead to the exhaust

The top of the showerhead is welded

The top of the showerhead is welded

The nozzle plate gets welded last

The nozzle plate gets welded last

Done!

Done!

Next I have to take the risers to the boat and do a final test fit. I still need to add a tab to the showerhead so I can attach a support arm; I don’t want all of that weight hanging off the turbo flange without additional support. Then I’ll insulate the riser with a combination of ceramic fiber blanket, which is good for continuous exposure to 2,600°F, then a layer of Inferno Wrap to hold that tightly in place, topped with fiberglass coated with high temp epoxy. I have a bottle of white epoxy colorant, which would look nice when the riser is new. I suspect it will brown a bit on the exhaust flange end once the engines run for a bit. All of the other hardshell risers I’ve seen are black, presumably because it hides any discoloration. Feel free to comment below about black/white preferences.

Next up on our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Making the Battery Switch Mount

Advertisements

5 comments on “1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Welding the Port Exhaust Riser Showerhead

  1. walt chandler says:

    Definitely white!

  2. Tom aka Florida Boater says:

    If you are not sold on either color yet I would offer this; a lighter color in a confined space won’t “eat up” available ambient light as much as black will. Will it brown up from the high temps? Possibly, but brown is still lighter than black. Been is some dark, dark bilges and when cleaned and painted a lighter color it made all the difference in the world. But that is just my opinion, you have planned for ample lighting already, but every little bit helps.

  3. Scott says:

    Hi Q, Looking soooo good. I think I would pick the areas that are going to brown and do them in Black. I hate that browned out white look on white engines. Just makes them look old. I am sure you could tape one area off and run the other color up to it for a straight line between. I know hoe picky you are. Happy Holidays.Scott

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s