1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Polishing Even More Stainless

Bad news: my boatamalan* painter has gone off the grid. He came by the tent a month ago and we talked about next steps for the v-berth head. He was going to come by that Thursday and get to work. But when I arrived on the weekend, it was clear he hadn’t come by. Since then, he hasn’t responded to phone calls or text messages, and his coworkers have indicated that he doesn’t come to work regularly anymore. I know he’s been a disgruntled employee for a while now, and for good reasons by the sound of it, but he’s also had health problems. Since he doesn’t respond, I have no idea if he quit his job or is in the hospital. I haven’t given up on him yet, but for now all paint operations are suspended indefinitely.

* Boatamalan: portmanteau indicating highly skilled boat workers of Central American origin. They’re actually from Honduras, but Boatamalan rolls off the tongue better. ;-)

In the meantime, I’ve been polishing stainless…lots and lots of stainless…and also getting the glass installed in the portholes. On the stainless, it’s not just a trivial matter of making things pretty. Each rub rail and vent involves many screw holes and other openings into the boat, so they’ve got to be installed before I can even wash the dust off the outside. I’ve got the process pretty much nailed down, but each 12′ rub rail takes about 6 hours to polish, and more complicated pieces take even more time.

All the big trees around the tent have been removed

All the big trees around the tent have been removed

The tree removal crew got rid of the rotten old trees next to the tent without causing any damage. That’s pretty amazing considering how many big limbs were hanging over the tent. The tent’s a lot brighter inside than it used to be. In summer, it’ll be hotter, too. Gotta get this thing done…

9 portholes are ready to install, 5 to go

9 portholes are ready to install, 5 to go

Lower rub rail is 16' long, with a bend near the end

Lower rub rail is 16′ long, with a bend near the end

Two polishing jigs help hold it in position

Two polishing jigs help hold it in position

The floppy end is hard to polish

The floppy end is hard to polish

2 screws and a broken board stabilize the floppy end

2 screws and a broken board stabilize the floppy end

First, identify all scratches and gouges

First, sand lightly to clean the surface and identify scratches and gouges

Use 150 grit to remove scratches and gouges

Use 150 grit to remove scratches and gouges

Next, go to 220 grit

Next, go to 220 grit

Next, ramp up to 320 wet or dry paper dipped in water

Next, ramp up to 320 wet or dry paper dipped in water

Then 400 wet or dry

Then 400 grit wet or dry

Followed by 600 wet or dry

Followed by 600 grit wet or dry

Then 1000 wet or dry

Then 1000 wet or dry

1200 wet or dry

1200 wet or dry

And finally 1500 wet

And finally 1500 wet

After sanding with 1500 grit, the stainless is pretty shiny. Hitting it with the buffer really knocks it home. There are three courses for buffing, first using black emory, then brown tripoli, and finally white diamond compounds.

That's some good lookin' stainless

That’s some good lookin’ stainless

Shiny!

8 hours later…Shiny!

Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Engine Room LED Lighting

Advertisements

4 comments on “1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Polishing Even More Stainless

  1. Carlo Garcia j.r. says:

    I have been following a little. My dock neighbor was a chris Craft dealer in the 60 he has a 1965 Constalation a belive 16′ runabout in mit condition. Another dock neighbor has a Roamer he is living onand refurbishing. Again my neighbor has tons of documents catalogs old archieved Chris Craft stuff he was friendly with the family .

  2. Peter Hitchcock says:

    Must say you’re doing a great Job, polishing is boring, but very productive, and look at that lovely finish… Hope the painter resurfaces or you can find another one… Keep up the good work…

  3. Marty Molloy says:

    Looking great, I don’t think that I’d have enough patience to do all of that. ;0) Nice work!

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s