1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: The V-berth “Throne Room” III

When last I wrote about the V-berth head (AKA the “throne room”), the throne area was pretty well roughed out and epoxy was curing on the last panel I attached to the side cabinet. The side cabinet will serve two purposes: it acts as the “chase” through which wiring, water, and the sink drain pipe will pass out of sight. The second, and more readily apparent, purpose will be that it’s where the toilet paper will be stored, behind two 1/4″ mahogany plywood bypass sliding doors. The next thing I need to do is to make the cabinet interior, glue it all together, insulate the outside of the cabinet interior panels (we don’t want condensation dripping on toilet paper in winter 😉 ), then cut the cabinet face panel opening. Since, like many things on this refit, I’ve never made cabinets before, this should be interesting.

Clamps off; the side cabinet carcass is glued and screwed together

Clamps off; the side cabinet carcass is glued and screwed together

More scraps put to good use!

More scraps put to good use!

When I cut out the porthole openings in the 1/4″ African mahogany plywood for the aft stateroom, the ICA-coated wood looked so nice and the scraps were big enough that I hung onto them. They just happened to be the right dimensions for the toilet paper storage inside the throne side cabinet.

Line up the pencil mark with the edge of my Eureka Zone circular saw track

Line up the pencil mark with the edge of my Eureka Zone circular saw track

These track saws are really cool. They work like a panel saw in that the panel doesn’t move, only the saw does, but they’re lightweight, portable, and extremely accurate. The saw will cut right to the edge of the plastic track, so as long as my eyes hold up I can set it to cut on either edge of the pencil line or straight through the middle of it.

Cut off right on the mark

Next, I routed a slot in the 1/2" mahogany ply base of the cabinet interior

Next, I routed a slot in the 1/2″ mahogany ply base of the cabinet interior

This piece of plywood was a scrap, too. Booyah 🙂

Starting to feel like a cabinetmaker

Varnish the 1/2" mahogany ply base panel

I varnished the visible portion of the 1/2″ mahogany ply base panel

The whole time I was cutting these panels, I had an idea of how the panels would all fit together, and how the back panels (which I’ll make later) would eventually fit inside the cabinet and seal up the space. But as more of the top, side, and bottom pieces got done, I realized I probably shouldn’t have used the 1/4″ ply for the sides and top. There need to be slots in each of those panels, too–to match the bottom slot–so the back panels have something to slide into and form a seal.

Hmmm…there’s more to this cabinetmaking thing than I guessed. After scratching my head over that one for a bit, I ran a couple of solid mahogany pieces from some old cleats through my ShopSmith table saw and made some parts that should work.

So I ripped off a couple of solid mahogany pieces from some old cleats more scraps!)

More scraps put to good use

And epoxied them to the back side of the 1/4" mahogany panels

New “slots” epoxied to the back side of the 1/4″ mahogany panels

The back of the cabinet interior will be made of two panels that slide home into those slots on either side and the bottom. A solid stock trim piece will seal the joint between the two panels.

More varnish on the 1/2" interior base panel

More varnish on the 1/2″ interior base panel

Then insulate the inside of the side cabinet carcass before calling it a day

Then insulate the inside of the side cabinet carcass before calling it a day

Same as before, I cut the Buffalo Batt (r3) insulation to fit, then wet out the inner surfaces of the cabinet with epoxy and apply the batts. I use scraps of wood, gravity, and clamps to lightly hold the insulation in place while the epoxy cures overnight. The processes I’m using for the interior panels–coating all of the backsides instead of just leaving them bare, gluing and screwing instead of just screwing, and especially insulating the back of each panel–takes a lot more time than just cutting panels and screwing everything together. Sometimes it’s frustratingly slow, but in the end I think we’ll be glad I took the time to do it this way. With wet varnish and epoxy everywhere, that’s a wrap for today.

Next up on our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: New Toys Tools and Fuel Inlet Pipes

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2 comments on “1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: The V-berth “Throne Room” III

  1. Chris G says:

    WOW! What an impressive effort. I am exhausted just reading your posts (took a few days to read through all your progress). I really enjoyed reading your story, and I am looking forward to future updates.

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