1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: The V-berth “Throne Room”

The V-berth head is coming together pretty well. I’ve got the ceilings cut and the step-up for the toilet framed. Now I need to install the platform and cabinetry surrounding the toilet.

Fwd head plan:

Fwd head plan (AKA “the throne room”)

As the forward head is coming together, something about that seat up on a dais reminded me of my dad saying he was “on the throne” when using the toilet. When we’re done with this, it’ll be all fancy, with fillets and sparkly, shiny Awlgrip paint…ergo, we’re now calling this the throne room. 🙂

Definitely NOT scrap

Definitely NOT scrap

When we started the refit and were deep into demolition mode, I kept a lot of the original plywood that was still solid thinking it would come in handy later. The two sheets in the pic above came from the original salon built-in sofa, which we’ve decided to remake in the original style. I knew I’d kept the sheet on the right, but when I pulled the sheet on the left from the stack of scrap, the side you see here was facing away from me. I tossed it in the truck and brought it to the boat, intending to use it as the base platform for the forward head toilet and cabinets. It was only when I got to the yard that I saw this side, with the solid mahogany pics clearly outlining the sofa back and drawer supports below. On the one hand, I was very pleased to have found that piece of the sofa puzzle. On the other hand, I then had to make a trip to Exotic Lumber for a sheet of 3/4″ Doug fir marine ply.

EZ One track saw makes laser-straight cuts

EZ One track saw makes laser-straight cuts

Typical boat…nothing’s square

Jigsaw cuts slots for the hull frames

Jigsaw cuts slots for the hull frames

A little tight in one corner

A little tight in one corner…can’t quite push it to the line

One slot is a little tight, too.

The tip of one slot is a little tight to the aluminum frame, too.

Nice fit!

Nice fit!

Fitting the cabinet face was a challenge

Fitting the cabinet face was a challenge

The new “throne room” platform is flat, relative to the V-berth floor, so cutting the three sides of the cabinet face panel was easy. But the edge that abuts the hull panel was a challenge, with angled cuts in two planes plus a cut-out for wiring and (eventual) plumbing.

One more touch-up cut on the back edge and it'll fit perfectly

One more touch-up cut on the back edge and it’ll fit perfectly

Cabinet top panel is cut, glued, screwed, and clamped, just for good measure

Cabinet top panel is cut, glued, screwed, and clamped, just for good measure

Throne room platform floor gets epoxy sealed and insulated

The under-side of the throne room platform floor gets epoxy sealed and insulated

That Buffalo Batt insulation is working out very well. Over the winter, it was amazing how much faster the boat warmed up than before I started installing insulation. On the down-side, it takes a lot more time to get panels done and installed, but ultimately I think we’ll be very glad the back-side of each interior panel is insulated.

Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 49 Refit: The V-berth “Throne Room” II

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