1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Staining the Salon Mahogany

We already sanded the original mahogany in the salon with 120 and 220 grit, and I cut two plywood panels to replace original panels that had suffered damage for decades from the leaking teak side decks and the leaking salon roof. The next step is to sand the whole shebang with 320 grit and apply Pettit 1095P Standard Mahogany filler stain. I would have preferred to just paint ICA base coat clear over the beautiful wood, but there is some discoloration on the original mahogany that won’t sand out. Plus, there’s a big color difference between the old mahogany and the new. The stain should even everything out.

First, a review of what we started with:

Our salon, circa 2007, when we first started this project

And here it is sanded to 220 grit in September 2015:

And then jumping forward to October 2015…

Dust bomb went off

Dust bomb went off

Even with the dust extractors and collectors running, a lot of fine mahogany dust went flying while we were doing the final sanding.

But we got 'er done

But we got ‘er done

All cleaned up and ready for stain

All cleaned up and ready for stain

Also, note in the picture above that I removed all of the trim pieces. We’ll be sanding, staining, and clear coating those separately to ensure that all surfaces are coated. Later, after the trim is all reinstalled, we’ll spray ICA top coat clear over everything.

Salon steps got sanded, too, but I’ll cover them in a forthcoming article

I’m using a different process for the steps since they see pretty hard service. More on that later.

The Pettit 1095P evened out the color

The Pettit 1095P evened out the color

Jamestown Distributors has a youtube video showing the Pettit stain product and process. It’s time consuming, but you don’t get the streaky, splotchy results that sometimes happen with other brush-on stains.

Pettit 1095P is quite red

The stained original mahogany is so red that it looks like a pretty close match to the new mahogany, as in the shot below of the aft stateroom wall panels. Of course, things change when they get clear coated. But for now, we’re going to mask off the new plywood panels I made for the salon and not stain them. We’ll see how it turns out and go from there.

That’s a wrap for the stain.

Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Prepping the Salon Trim for Varnish

 

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