1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Aft Stateroom Wall Panel Install

Since the insulated galley wall install went pretty well, I decided to try the process out on some of the pretty African mahogany panels that go around the aft stateroom porthole openings.

1/4" African mahogany panel finished in ICA base-coat clear

1/4″ African mahogany panel finished in ICA base-coat clear

I added a cleat to secure the leading edge of the panel to the bathroom wall

I added a cleat to secure the leading edge of the new panel to the bathroom wall

I cut out notches to make space for the hull frames on the transom

I cut out notches to make space for the hull frames on the transom

As you can see in the pics, the back-side of the panel is still bare wood. The plan is to get the final fit right, then coat the backs and all edges with epoxy. The ICA coating on the face will allow me to wipe off any wet epoxy with an ethanol-soaked rag. With the panel fitting to the hull and interior wall, the next step involved the missus holding the panel in place while I marked the porthole openings from outside.

Cutting out the porthole openings

Cutting out the porthole openings

Two down...

Two down…

Good test fit at the transom and window cut-outs

Good test fit at the transom and window cut-outs

African mahogany panel-to-panel fit is good, too.

African mahogany panel-to-panel fit is good, too.

Epoxy coating and insulating the back of the panel

Epoxy coating and insulating the back of the panel

On the galley panel I installed recently to test my insulation plan, I used 3M spray-on contact cement to adhere the Buffalo Batt polyester nonwoven fabric insulation to the cured epoxy protecting the back of the panel. I figured I could save a step by applying the insulation as I roll on the sealing epoxy coat. The missus was a big help putting her craft skills to work cutting the insulation to size, leaving room for the attachment points.

Insulation applied to port and starboard panels, then pressed together until the epoxy cures

Insulation applied to port and starboard panels, then pressed gently together until the epoxy cures

Epoxy drippage from edge sealing was caught by tape

Epoxy drippage from edge sealing was caught by tape

Tape comes off clean, leaving no residue or stains on the African mahogany

Tape comes off clean, leaving the edges sealed with no residue or stains on the African mahogany

If I hadn’t already finished the front face with ICA base-coat, the epoxy would have bled under the tape and stained the pretty mahogany.

Ready for installation

Ready for installation

Nice!

Nice!

The dead air cavity between the insulated hull and the insulated interior panel

The dead air cavity between the insulated hull and the insulated interior panel

The insulation gurus all say that dead air space between the outer and inner layers of insulation significantly adds to insulating properties of the material. Hopefully, this approach is worth the effort.

Before I permanently install these panels, I need to assemble the portholes and get some other things done. So for now, the panels are sitting in place, out of the way, covered in plastic, and protected from abrasion. With the heat of summer making it too hot in the tent to work up top-side, I’m getting myself into the engine room next.

Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Gantry Time II!

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5 comments on “1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Aft Stateroom Wall Panel Install

  1. John U says:

    Really impressive!

  2. M says:

    Awesome stuff there, Q. That Mahogany will look great!

  3. Kenny King says:

    Quentin, Your skills never cease to amaze me. I figured I would let you get a litlle further along before I requested visiting privileges. Regards, Ken

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