1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Installing The Last Aft Stateroom Walls

The aft stateroom wall installation was going pretty smoothly. Gluing and screwing pre-finished panels to the corner pieces, floor, and overhead frames is working out well. Just two more wall sections to go, and the aft stateroom major wall installation is nearly done.

The new walls going in today, per The Plan

The new walls going in today, per The Plan

Good test fit for the toilet cubby wall

Good test fit for the toilet cubby wall

Dry fitted with clamps

Dry fitted with clamps

Nice, tight joint

Nice, tight joint

You can see some sanding marks printing through the finish, but keep in mind that ICA is a base-coat/top coat system. The sanding marks and surface imperfections in the base coat will vanish when it’s sanded and top coated.

Wet out the joint with straight epoxy, then coat with epoxy thickened with wood flour and cabosil

Gluing the joint

I wetted out the joint with straight epoxy, then coated it with epoxy thickened with wood flour and cabosil.

Same treatment for the solid mahogany corner piece

Same treatment for the solid mahogany corner piece

Next, attach the cleats and slide the panel home

Slide the panel home, gluing and screwing to overhead 1″x1″ cleats

Got another wall in!

Got another wall in! The toilet cubby lives!

The aft stateroom is really coming together...maybe a bit too fast.

The aft stateroom is really coming together…maybe a bit too fast

The pic above shows a wee bit of a problem that I’d foreseen and considered and had a plan to avoid…that I completely overlooked until it was almost too late. More on that later…

The next corner piece goes in

The next corner piece goes in

I had to notch the top just a wee bit to clear the backing block overhead

I had to notch the top just a wee bit to clear the backing block overhead

Nice fit...ready for the panel

Nice fit…ready for the panel…but what was I thinking?

The back story here is that I was selling a piece of equipment on this day and the buyer was coming to pick it up at my house at 6pm. It’s an hour commute from my house to the boatyard. The walls were going in pretty quickly and I’ve got the process nailed, so I decided to get ‘er done and install the last wall before going home. It would be close, but I could do it. Looking at these pix now, I can’t believe I was so focused on gettin’ ‘er done that I didn’t see the problem I was creating.

Cut out the notch for the overhead butt block

Cut out the notch for the overhead butt block

Super awesome Kreg R3 Jr pocket hole screw jig makes fast work of pre-drilling

Super awesome Kreg R3 Jr pocket hole screw jig makes fast work of pre-drilling for the floor joint

Nice alignment with the Concept Plan I traced onthe floor

Nice alignment with the Concept Plan I traced on the floor

Bracining the panel

Bracing the panel to avoid creep

Pocket screw joinery is popular, in part, because the screws draw the pieces together very tightly. The screws go in at a very shallow angle — I believe it’s 10 degrees — so most of the clamping force is applied in line with the screw. But with glued and screwed applications, the glue acts as a lubricant and that 10 degree skew can cause the panel to creep up to 3/32″. To stop panel creep, I used scraps of wood and a wedge to keep the panel right over the lines I have laid out on the floor while I drive the pocket screws home.

Boom! Done! Time to clean up and get outta here

Boom! Done! Time to clean up and get outta here!

Single flute cardboard protects the pre-finished wood

Single flute cardboard protects the pre-finished wood

Dang, that's pretty if I do say so myself

Dang, that’s pretty if I do say so myself

I know a lot of people like straight grained wood, but I really like the character that strategically placed knots add. This one’s at shoulder height…nice eye candy.

Coming together just like the Concept Plans

Coming together just like the Concept Plans (except for that one teensy-weensy thing)

Good cleat fit overhead

Good cleat fit overhead…time to get home!

It was at about this time, while I was leaning over the new clothes dryer carton trying to get a shot of the inside of the new aft head wall that I realized I’d left the new clothes dryer carton inside the aft head when I installed the last of the walls. The door opening to the head is ~21 inches…about a foot too narrow to get the dryer out.

OMG

Fortunately, this was on a cold day and even though time had passed while I cleaned up and taped cardboard to the panels to protect the walls, the epoxy joint had not yet taken a hard set. So, I pulled out my cordless drill and very quickly removed all of the screws. There was a bit of a challenge removing the panel, since the wood flour and cabosil-thickened epoxy was in the process of setting, but in the end it all came apart just fine. While the wall was off, I pulled the dryer out of the bathroom and swapped it for the jet bathtub, which was sitting in its carton on the aft fuel tank. Then I put it all back together again, ending up with just a hint of a scuff on the tough ICA base coat clear. On the principle of “that’ll sand out,” I packed up, set the alarm, and was 20 minutes late getting home, but the buyer waited and the equipment went down the road as planned.

Sheesh…it’s never easy.

Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Insulation follow-up

 

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7 comments on “1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Installing The Last Aft Stateroom Walls

  1. Mark Balcaen says:

    Very nice work. I enjoy reading your blog and viewing the photos.

    I was wondering how you are going to get the tub and / or shower into the master head if the door opening is only 21″? I would have thought you would have placed them in the space before closing up the last wall. Unless your shower / tub is in pieces that will fit through the door and then be assembled. The problem with bathroom fixtures that hold water, and have a lot of pieces, is that there are more potential spots for water leaks and seepage. One piece showers or tub / shower enclosures reduce the opportunity for seam failure(s). Anyway, I am curious to know your plans for a shower or tub. I suspect that you will be running those services under the floor but I would think that fishing plumbing lines (water and sewer) and electrical lines through the bilges will be harder with the walls up.

    Also, I remember that you did two blogs on the engines, but there was nothing detailing the installation of the Cummings + transmissions or the generator. Any chance you have photos of the installation and you could put together an article? I recall you had contracted someone to do the welding but it would be nice to see the results (unless you have plans to do this later this year).

    Thanks
    Mark
    Lake of the Woods

    • 1969roamer46 says:

      Hi Mark, and thanks for the comments.

      The jet bathtub was sitting on the fuel tank when I initially installed the bathroom walls. When I discovered what I’d done, I removed the wall, swapped the dryer for the jet bath, and reinstalled the wall. If we were only doing a shower, I would have just made the shower enclosure out of plywood and fiberglass in situ. A forthcoming article will explain what I’m doing with the bathroom walls and ceiling in light of the jet tub.

      As far as wiring and plumbing, the bulkhead that makes up the main tub wall is also the engine room bulkhead, so passing wire and plumbing isn’t affected by the walls I’ve been installing.

      I will pick up the engine install again before too long. It was way too cold over the winter to be messing around with a couple of tons of iron. The plan at this point is to continue with the structural, glass, and other essentials, and get the boat sealed up from the weather. Once that’s wrapping up (which should be soon), I’ll get back to the engines.

      Stay tuned!
      Cheers,
      Q

  2. Marty Molloy says:

    Q has dogged nerve and rubber determination, or is that rubber nerve and dogged determination? Either way, that’s a boatload ‘o work going on there. ;0)

  3. tracy doriot says:

    I hate to put any pressure on you, but I really look forward to your updates ! Your workmanship without a cabinet shop full of bench tools is quite remarkable. Although the payoff will be seeing the completed project, as a nuts and bolts guy, watching the bits and pieces coming together is great entertainment. As mentioned once, I had started the refurbishment of a wood/fiberglass 31′ Fairliner. Thank heavens that ill gotten adventure went to wood boat heaven. Now my boat refurbishment aspirations live vicariously thru you ! Keep up the good work, and again, thanks for sharing ! Tracy

  4. John Longwell says:

    The first thing I thought of as I was scrolling down and saw the dryer and where you were going was “Do not forget to move the dryer.”

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