1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Off Comes the Plastic (AKA the Paint Job is Done)!

I recently made some changes to the navigation on this site to make it easier to find articles. The new article index has every one listed in chronological order. When I look at the titles of the articles I’ve written recently, with so many of them focused on windows, portholes and glass instead of epoxy, fairing or sanding, it’s pretty clear the body and paint work part of the refit is coming to a close. The cabin top, hull and decks were sprayed over the summer of 2013, as was the mahogany toe rail (the first time around). The blue accent stripes have been painted for weeks. The only thing left to bring closure to the exterior paint job is to spray the final coats of Imron MS1 on the toe rail and take off all of the tape and masking film, which is precisely what we did last weekend, in mid-November 2013.

New mahogany toe rail sanded and ready for the final coats of Imron MS1

New mahogany toe rail sanded and ready for the final coats of Imron MS1

We went through a total of three cases of 2″ 3M 233+ tape on this paint job. If I never see another roll, it will be too soon!

Sanded, taped, wiped, tacked off and ready to spray

Sanded, taped, wiped, tacked off and ready to spray

The Boatamalan painter sprayed on Saturday, then we all went home. I returned the following morning to pull all of the tape and hand masking film. Some of it had been on the boat for almost a month, since we painted the hull in Awlcraft 2000 Matterhorn White.

Et voila!

Et voila!

Without further ado…off came the plastic!

The helm station view hasn't changed much

The helm station view hasn’t changed much since we painted the dashboard and cabin top

The side deck view looks the same as when we did the nonskid

The side deck view looks pretty much the same as when we did the nonskid

Even the bow hasn't changed all that much

Even the bow hasn’t changed all that much

But it sure is nice to see all of the bits uncovered at the same time.

Tinted bow seat windows look pretty good

Tinted bow seat windows look pretty good

I’m still working with the manufacturer on some issues with these windows, so they’re just dry fit here. Still, I like the way they turned out and the effect the tinted windows have against the white cabin top.

Need to install the bow seat hatches...soon

Need to install the bow seat hatches…soon

Dropping down off the bow, we can finally see the whole paint job…sorta. The tent limits how much you can see at any one time.

Nice stripe!

Nice stripe!

Wild shot looking up from ground level

Wild shot looking up from ground level

The mirror-like reflection of the tent frames and walls in the new Awlgrip 2000, coupled with the upper accent stripe and boot stripe plus the chine as it goes forward to the stem yielded a mind-bending result through the camera lens when I put it on forced flash.

Red, white & blue seems appropriate for an American classic

Red, white & blue seems appropriate for an American classic

Yes, that reflected paint can does say Awlgrip!

Yes, that reflected paint can does say Awlgrip!

Again, props to the Boatamalan for flowing out the paint so well.

Shiny!

Shiny!

Somebody opened the door of the tent while I was pulling all of the plastic. He commented that it didn’t look like any metal boat he’d ever seen.

I agree. 🙂

Dang wire from the tent got in the way of this otherwise excellent shot!

Stbd side looks good, too

Stbd side looks good, too

Tinted windows really finish the look

Tinted windows really finish the look

Yeah, baby :-)

Yeah, baby 🙂

That's a mound of masking tape and film

That’s a mound of masking tape and film

It took the better part of six hours to pull it all, and at the end of the day the pile was high. I’ll be getting my money’s worth in dry slip fees this month just in garbage disposal alone! lol

That’s basically a wrap for the paint work. Next up in our 1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Polishing the Stainless Rub Rails.

12 comments on “1969 Chris Craft Roamer 46 Refit: Off Comes the Plastic (AKA the Paint Job is Done)!

  1. Bill Large says:

    One of the things I find interesting about your project is that ordinary boaters, such as the ones I spend my summers with, have no idea what a Roamer is. Chris~Craft is a name from the past; a company that made wood boats. Of course, there is more to Chris~Craft than that, but there isn’t much interest in restoration or all the research, hard work and cost that goes along with it.

    If you docked at our marina next summer, my dock neighbors would see your Roamer as a new, beautiful boat, If you offered the photos and experience behind your restoration, they would nod, and then go back to their fiberglass boats and say, “that you’ll never get your money out of it.”

    Indeed. But your desire to bring this old boat back goes way beyond what my dock neighbors would almost certainly say.

    Jerry Conrad’s book, “Chris~Craft The Essential Guide” shows that they only made 35 of the Roamer that you have. To me, a former wood Chris~Craft owner, that makes it well worth the sweat and money you have put into this restoration.

    Without you (and perhaps some others), there would be no more seaworthy Roamers, and that would be a piece of boating history that many of us don’t want to lose.

    I hope you’ll continue your blog after you launch your boat.

    Bill

    • 1969roamer46 says:

      Thanks for the comments, Bill.

      It’s funny you mention “ordinary boaters.” I’ve owned a 52′ Constellation and a 42′ Commander, and it’s as sure as the sun rising that most people who walk by these classics equate maintenance with pain. I never understood that. For me this stuff is fun and/or challenging, both mentally and physically, and it’s a whole lot cheaper than a shrink, depression medication and a gym membership! I can’t stand watching team sports, I don’t like shopping, and doing most outdoor sports lost its appeal when mountaintops started developing queues at the summit. I see transient boaters arrive at our docks who then head out daily to join the mass of tourists at the monuments…geesh…talk about cruel and unusual punishment.

      To each his own, I say! For me, messing around with the boat is about as close to nirvana as it gets.

      It’s absolutely true that I could not sell the boat for what I’m into it. Conversely, I would spend about 2~3x what I’ll finally be into this to buy a new or late model 46′ motor yacht…and it wouldn’t be that classic Chris shape we like so much. The bottom line is that there is no economic argument for these things. But the same is true for many things in life. When was the last time a vacation yielded an economic return on investment??? But hey, life ain’t all about the money, right?

      Cheers,
      Q

  2. William B. Kelleher says:

    I would be afraid to put her in the water for fear of scratching the paint.

    Bill Kelleher

  3. Tom Anderson says:

    I began reading this blog last winter when I stumbled upon it while searching for Seamaster turbo marine engines. Frankly, I’ve forgotten about the Seamasters, but I so look forward to each and every one of your posts documenting your progress. My hat’s off to you, you’re doing a quality job…

    • 1969roamer46 says:

      Thanks! It’s great to hear the encouragement. Every once in a while, I wonder how it would have turned out if I rebuilt the Seamasters, using aftermarket multipoint fuel injection and watercooled turbos rather than the carbureted, oil cooled turbos they came with. But then I see those two Cummins 430s in the ER and all of the work it’s going to take before I can light them off, and I, too, forget all about the Seamasters. 🙂
      Cheers,
      Q

  4. John says:

    What a beautiful undertaking….kudos!!!!!!!

  5. Mark Young says:

    Terrific to be able to see the work involved and the results that all the work provided. It will be an awesome feeling the first time you get her wet and fire up the engines. I promise you that the smile will last a long time. Keep posting!!
    Sundowner
    41 regalroamer 41-3510

  6. Awesome! She is looken good! Keep at it.

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